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Tag: Excavator

DEMOLITION CONTRACTOR’S PRAISE FOR NEW JCB X SERIES MODEL

A Dorset contractor has described his new JCB 220X as the ‘the perfect demolition excavator’ after 20 years of searching for a model with the machine’s combination of size stability, and breakout force.

Poole-based Advanced Demolition has purchased the new JCB 220X for its projects across the county – which include private residential work in the prestigious Sandbanks area of Poole. Supplied by dealer Holt JCB, the new excavator has also been put to use on commercial applications including the demolition of a factory in nearby Ferndown – completing the entire project from the initial asbestos removal, through to clearing the site ready for the construction of a new modern building.

The exceptional reach on the JCB 220X enabled Advanced Demolition to cut out steel uprights, trusses and purlins without disturbing the three external walls that were at risk of collapse.

I’ve worked in demolition for the last 27 years and I’ve never truly found an excavator in this size range that has the stability and grunt of the traditional, purpose-built demolition machines that used to be available – until now. I’ve spent the last 20 years looking for the ideal machine and as soon as Holt JCB sent me the specifications for the X Series I knew we were in business. It has the perfect combination of size, weight, power, stability and ripping force.

JCB unveils hydrogen fuelled excavator

JCB has developed what it says is the construction industry’s first ever hydrogen powered excavator.

A prototype 20-tonne 220X excavator powered by a hydrogen fuel cell has been undergoing testing at JCB’s quarry proving grounds for more than 12 months.

JCB is in a race with rival manufacturers to bring hydrogen powered machinery to the market.  Hyundai Construction Equipment revealed in March that it plans to start mass distribution of hydrogen fuel excavators in 2023. Others are also understood to have projects in development.

But JCB says it is the first construction equipment company in the world to unveil a working prototype of an excavator powered by hydrogen. Hydrogen reacts with oxygen in a fuel cell to create the energy needed to run electric motors. The only emission from the exhaust is water.

Hydrogen fuel cells are already powering some static plant on UK construction sites. AJC Easy Cabin’s Ecosmart Zero welfare cabins are powered primarily by solar power but, instead of having a traditional diesel generator in support, have a back-up hydrogen fuel cell to eliminate local carbon emissions completely. Water vapour is the only by-product.

A prototype 20-tonne 220X excavator powered by a hydrogen fuel cell has been undergoing testing at JCB’s quarry proving grounds for more than 12 months.

JCB is in a race with rival manufacturers to bring hydrogen powered machinery to the market.  Hyundai Construction Equipment revealed in March that it plans to start mass distribution of hydrogen fuel excavators in 2023. Others are also understood to have projects in development.

But JCB says it is the first construction equipment company in the world to unveil a working prototype of an excavator powered by hydrogen. Hydrogen reacts with oxygen in a fuel cell to create the energy needed to run electric motors. The only emission from the exhaust is water.

Hydrogen fuel cells are already powering some static plant on UK construction sites. AJC Easy Cabin’s Ecosmart Zero welfare cabins are powered primarily by solar power but, instead of having a traditional diesel generator in support, have a back-up hydrogen fuel cell to eliminate local carbon emissions completely. Water vapour is the only by-product.

JCB chairman Lord Bamford said: “The development of the first hydrogen fuelled excavator is very exciting as we strive towards a zero carbon world. In the coming months, JCB will continue to develop and refine this technology with advanced testing of our prototype machine and we will continue to be at the forefront of technologies designed to build a zero carbon future.”

Lord Bamford’s son Jo Bamford spent 14 years at JCB before moving into the hydrogen sector, setting up Ryse Hydrogen and then buying Northern Ireland bus maker Wrightbus. He has won contracts to supply the world’s first hydrogen double-decker to cities such as London and Aberdeen.

Jo Bamford introduced Ryse to a fringe meeting of the Conservative Party Conference in October 2019. “We have a very simple vision: to totally decarbonise the entire UK bus fleet by 2030,” he said. “Whilst there have been great strides in developing electric vehicle technology, we risk overlooking hydrogen as a practical, here and now solution to tackling emissions and improving air quality… Our modelling shows that if you reach scale, fuel cell buses will be cheaper than battery electric buses and 12% cheaper than diesel buses by 2030. And once you’ve cracked buses, you can move on trucks, trains, ships and planes.”

Last year JCB went into full production with its fully electric mini excavator, the 19C-1E, powered by lithium-ion batteries. JCB has also extended electric technology to its Teletruk telescopic forklift range with the launch of the battery-powered JCB 30-19E.

How to choose an excavator?

How to choose an excavator?

Dear Friends! We all know how important it is to be well-informed to avoid mistakes because of misinformation. This counts even more if it is about purchasing or renting a new piece of equipment.

It’s like preparing an interview: first you analyze and compare details, and then you draw up a profile of your potential partner asking the right questions! So, what to do if your partner isn’t a person but an excavator? The procedure is just the same. Asking suitable questions for details and then making the decision! Let’s see how…

4 important questions to ask to get the best excavator

So, let’s waste no time starting straightaway with our interview. It’s like a jigsaw puzzle; by the end all small pieces will be glued into the right place to form a picture. Are you ready? Ok, so we can start with the most important questions, and step by step you’ll get a clearer picture.

  1. Which kind of excavator does best suit for the job? Before buying, better evaluate the type of job you’re going to do. Will the equipment be used for a single sort of operation or shall it perform multiple tasks? How many jobs or how many operating hours shall it face during its life cycle? Answering these questions will lead you in the right direction. For instance, renting an excavator may be a valid option if you need the equipment only now and then, or for a single job.
  2. Does the excavator maintain both stability and power at the construction site? A good excavator should provide a balanced combination of power and stability during both digging and lifting operations. Cutting-edge electro-hydraulic technology allows for operating appropriately with a powerful engine, ensuring major operator control, enhanced productivity as well as reduced fuel consumption (not to forget the benefit of the environment).
  3. Does the excavator need to travel? If you need a versatile piece of equipment that can quickly move from one place to another on large construction sites, a wheeled excavator is the best choice. In this case, you can actually adjust speed according to the job and the surface, on which it moves. In addition, this type of excavator is quite compact so that you can operate efficiently also in traffic zones without the need for closing the entire road section or damaging existing infrastructures.
  4. In which state of the equipment do we need maintenance? Like for every piece of equipment, an accurate periodical maintenance is good practice, if you want to avoid unexpected events or expensive standstills. As the saying goes: “Prevention is better than cure.” So pay attention to the times indicated in the manufacturer’s handbook and always make a visual check of each component to be sure that everything is alright.

Tips on Selecting the Right Excavator Bucket

To coincide with the launch of our new EC200E excavator, I thought it would be helpful to provide a quick overview of excavator buckets, especially for any new excavator owners out there.

When it comes to selecting buckets, the options can seem limitless. That’s because excavators can tackle a diverse range of projects. There really is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to utilizing excavator buckets across different jobsites — even across a range of projects on the same site.

Three of the biggest considerations to keep in mind when selecting a bucket are:

  1. The quality of the bucket and its features
  2. Bucket size
  3. Matching the bucket to the application

Whether you’re well-versed in excavator buckets or still learning, you’ll find value in these tips. That’s because the consequences of using the wrong bucket can be significant. If you don’t have the right bucket for your specific application, you’ll likely see lower productivity and fuel efficiency. You could also have premature wear of the bucket.

Bucket Quality

All buckets are not made equal, so you’ll want to do your homework to ensure you get the best bucket for your needs. One thing to look for is features that promote durability and reduced wear, such as wear strips that protect the bucket’s sides and back, and side cutters that protect the bucket’s cutting edge and improve penetration.

And don’t forget about what’s on the edge of the bucket to engage the ground and the material. If you don’t have the right edge or teeth, you won’t be able to do your job the way you want. For example, general purpose buckets typically have teeth, which is great for excavating. But if you’re doing grading or landscaping work, Volvo offers a bucket with a bolt-on edge to help give your work a smooth finish. For extremely compact material, on the other hand, you may need pick-point teeth. Also look at the tip radius — a short tip radius produces enhanced break-out force which reduces wear on the bucket and a long tip radius offers greater bucket capacity.

Volvo recently launched an all-new premium tooth system that not only increases productivity and fuel efficiency, but is also more wear resistant and much easier to fit, thanks to a hammer-less pin design. The teeth feature a new locking system that has a reusable locking pin, which locks into place simply by twisting it a quarter turn. You just place, push and twist — that’s it. With a system like this, you won’t always be in the market for a brand-new bucket.

Picking the Right Size

There are a lot of factors that go into picking the right size of bucket, including:

  • Application: I’ll get into applications in greater detail below, but you want to maximize your bucket size for the application so that you can get more work done quicker. You can go too big, though, and hurt your productivity. A bucket that’s too large can slow cycle times, especially when moving high-density material. Also, digging a 24-inch trench using a 36-inch bucket would, obviously, be counter-productive.
  • Material Type and Density: The material you’re working with and its density factor into how much you can actually pick up, which in turn affects the bucket size. As noted above, having too much of a high-density material in your bucket can hurt cycle times.
  • Excavator Specs: The excavator’s size, configuration, desired reach and other specs help determine bucket size. It stands to reason that you wouldn’t put the same size of bucket on a 14-ton excavator as you’d put on a 75-ton machine. At Volvo, we have bucket sizes listed for our machines to ensure proper sizing is simple.
  • Haul Truck Capacity: In order to fill up trucks as quickly as possible in the fewest number of passes, match the excavator’s productivity and bucket size with the capacity of the truck. You’ll get more done in less time, lower fuel consumption and reduce wear on your machines.
Good quality heavy duty machinery is expensive. For some businesses, an excavator might be the most expensive tool in their warehouse. As with any investment, it is important to protect it and ensure it remains functional for the longest possible time. There are a number of considerations when it comes to storing construction equipment, and not all of them are obvious. In this article, we will briefly describe some of the common threats to construction equipment, and how best to mediate these threats to ensure the longevity of your materials. Clean and Dry One of the most obvious, but also difficult, aspects of construction equipment (https://www.julyparts.com/shop/) maintenance is managing rust and corrosion. Producers of this equipment are aware of this challenge, and so they use strong, corrosion resistant and reliable materials. All of the best manufacturing in the world won’t stop the rain from falling, however, and corrosion is always a long term risk for metal components. Mud can be exceptionally damaging over enough time, while still being the bread and butter of what construction equipment is designed to deal with. The real dangers of mud and water are related to long term contact, not day to day exposure. For this reason, whenever you are storing your equipment it makes sense to put it away while they’re clean and dry to avoid potential dramas. Service Regularly Heavy machinery comes with guidelines on how regularly certain components need to be serviced and it is important to stick to these guidelines. Having components fail on you can cost exorbitant amounts of money to replace, particularly if the failure triggers a cascade of failures. Often those guidelines will include two numbers, like 3000km/3 years. This means that whichever one of those numbers comes first, it’s time for a service, even if your excavator has been sitting in the shed for two thirds of that time. Preventing Theft Thefts is often a secondary consideration when it comes to proper storage of construction equipment, but the unfortunate reality is expensive machines fetch a significant sum on the black market. It is well worth understanding that your super power generator, which powers entire worksites, could be adapted by someone else to power their off-grid home. Install security cameras, GPS tracking devices, extra locks and even 24/7 security patrols, which may be cost effective mechanisms for preventing theft.

Storing Your Construction Equipment Right

Good quality heavy duty machinery is expensive. For some businesses, an excavator might be the most expensive tool in their warehouse. As with any investment, it is important to protect it and ensure it remains functional for the longest possible time. There are a number of considerations when it comes to storing construction equipment, and not all of them are obvious. In this article, we will briefly describe some of the common threats to construction equipment, and how best to mediate these threats to ensure the longevity of your materials.

Clean and Dry

One of the most obvious, but also difficult, aspects of construction equipment (https://www.julyparts.com/shop/) maintenance is managing rust and corrosion. Producers of this equipment are aware of this challenge, and so they use strong, corrosion resistant and reliable materials. All of the best manufacturing in the world won’t stop the rain from falling, however, and corrosion is always a long term risk for metal components. Mud can be exceptionally damaging over enough time, while still being the bread and butter of what construction equipment is designed to deal with. The real dangers of mud and water are related to long term contact, not day to day exposure. For this reason, whenever you are storing your equipment it makes sense to put it away while they’re clean and dry to avoid potential dramas.

Service Regularly

Heavy machinery comes with guidelines on how regularly certain components need to be serviced and it is important to stick to these guidelines. Having components fail on you can cost exorbitant amounts of money to replace, particularly if the failure triggers a cascade of failures. Often those guidelines will include two numbers, like 3000km/3 years. This means that whichever one of those numbers comes first, it’s time for a service, even if your excavator has been sitting in the shed for two thirds of that time.

Preventing Theft

Thefts is often a secondary consideration when it comes to proper storage of construction equipment, but the unfortunate reality is expensive machines fetch a significant sum on the black market. It is well worth understanding that your super power generator, which powers entire worksites, could be adapted by someone else to power their off-grid home. Install security cameras, GPS tracking devices, extra locks and even 24/7 security patrols, which may be cost effective mechanisms for preventing theft.

Safety Chains & Excavator Trailer Safety

Trailer safety is not a compromise, especially when you’re towing a trailer with an excavator. While it might seem like common sense to drive safely when towing, there’s a lot more to it when you’re carrying a heavy load. We have some tips and pointers for you to help you manage your trailer safely on the road.

Critical Safety Tips

The bottom line with trailer safety is making sure your trailer is secure and safe on the road. You need to cover all the angles:

  • Safety chains: Whatever load you’re carrying, you may need one or more safety chains depending on the loaded weight of the trailer. Safety chains must be connected to the towbar.
  • Towbars: Towbars must be rated to at least the weight of the load. Underweight towbars are major risks on the road; they can’t manage the heavier load and may even detach while driving.
  • Braking systems: Braking systems (https://www.julyparts.com/?s=brake) may or may not be legally required for lighter weight loads, but they’re good value for safety on the road. Best practice is to have a braking system that is operable from the driver’s seat.
  • Towing vehicle requirements: The vehicle must not carry loads over the manufacturer’s rated towing capacity and the trailer’s towing capacity. If you try to haul a trailer over either the vehicle or the trailer’s capacity, there are very serious risks of instant failure.
  • Rear marker plates: If your trailer is over 7.5m long, you must have a Do Not Overtake Turning Vehicle plate attached to the trailer. This is also a useful reminder to following vehicles that you’re driving a long trailer with a turning curve slower than they are, so it’s well worth fitting these plates.

Safe Towing: Things to Look Out for on the Road

Anyone who’s ever towed a heavy load will tell you that you can actually feel load problems within seconds of starting. The above points are the simplest ways to ensure that your vehicle and trailer perform well.

Major issues with a towed load include:

  • The sluggish or erratic performance of a trailer on bends in the road: This indicates that the trailer is lagging behind and that it may drift outwards or inwards towards traffic or the road edge. The trailer can also act as a counterweight, pulling against or away from the direction of your vehicle’s movement. At the first sign of performance issues, check the trailer.
  • Steering issues caused by the load: If the towing vehicle isn’t responding properly to steering, the load may be unsafe. The risk is that you may not be able to respond quickly enough to traffic movements or sudden events. Don’t take any risks with an unpredictable steering situation; you need a bigger, better trailer to manage the load.

Checklist – Purchasing Construction Equipment

If you’re in the construction industry, purchasing equipment is an ongoing evaluation of choices and costs. There is a vast amount of equipment available, all of which is a potential major asset. While this means plenty of choices for the consumer, it can also mean difficulty choosing appropriate equipment.

We’ve put together a checklist to make your purchasing decisions a bit easier.

Understand the Basics

Start at the beginning. What do you need? What’s your budget? What are your choices?

Let’s look at the absolute basics. There are two categories of must-have construction equipment:

  • Essential construction equipment: What are your top priorities? Do you need an excavator, a stump grinder, a trench digger, an onsite power generator, or a mix of these things? Make a short list with your budget in mind.
  • Attachments and accessories for your equipment: Will you need a hydraulic hammer, a trailer for travel, a palette fork, or other gear? To decide, stick to the attachments and accessories that are required for your work. Plan your purchasing strictly on a needs basis. If you don’t need something right now, it can wait.

Planning Your Purchases

OK, you’ve got your lists. Now you can assess what’s available on the market and break down your choices into simple but effective options.

For example – let’s assume you want an excavator. This is your checklist for the essentials:

  • Suitable for your core work: This is a yes/no answer. Stick to the equipment that delivers the capacity you need. Check performance, product specifications, and all the other critical data to make sure.
  • Able to carry all the attachments you need, like hydraulic hammers, etc.: Your attachments and accessories list simplifies your range of choices by eliminating unsuitable equipment. Ensure the attachments are suitable for your choice of machine and check their performance information as a guide.
  • New or used? This isn’t entirely a cost issue. Sometimes used equipment is a very good option. If you find a reliable piece of equipment you know is good and can do the job, a used machine is likely to be a good choice. As long as you can get a used machine serviced, it’s a potentially viable option.
  • Spare parts (https://www.julyparts.com/shop/): If there’s any doubt at all about spares, forget about the purchase. All machines need spares. You should be able to access authentic parts, too, particularly for good brands.
  • Servicing: Like spares, it’s essential that you understand the servicing schedule and the ease of servicing before you purchase. It’s not worth the frustration to buy equipment that might be hard to service. That can be expensive and it will risk significant downtime.

How Do I Become an Excavator Operator?

A person who wants to become an excavator operator may want to consider training at a technical school, apprenticing or learning on a job site, or obtaining a community college degree in heavy equipment operation. Each career path has advantages and disadvantages that can be weighed. For someone who is not sure about the best way to become an excavator operator, one option is to look at job listings to determine what kinds of requirements the employers in a given region expect of job applicants. This can help someone decide how to get his or her training.

One way to become an excavator operator is through a program at a technical school. The length of heavy equipment operator programs can vary and might include classroom and field experience. Students have a chance to learn about health and safety regulations and how excavators work. In the field, they can practice with different models. The instructor might also provide information about maintenance and repair so that operators can manage the basic care needs of their equipment.

Community colleges also offer training programs. The training at a community college can be similar to that found at a technical school. Instructors might start students with a basic overview of light and heavy equipment, then provide the students with practical experience. Some community colleges might connect students with internship opportunities in this field and can offer job placement in some regions to graduates who excel at their work. The school might refer the top students in the class to a local employer who has an interest in the college’s graduates.

Another option is through apprenticeship on the job, a very traditional approach to training. Apprentices start out in entry-level positions under the supervision of an experienced excavator operator. An apprentice might start with light equipment until he or she is competent, then the apprentice can begin training to become an excavator operator. First, the apprentice will work only under the eyes of monitors, and later, more autonomy and independence are granted, until the apprentice completes training and can work without supervision.

Some workplaces might accept high school graduates who don’t have any formal training and send them to a trade school to become excavator operators. This is a faster track than an apprenticeship and might allow workers to draw pay while training, unlike a technical school or community college program. Employers also can send their workers to safety training courses and might offer more compensation to people who are certified as safety officers and who can monitor conditions on work sites.

Your Mini Excavator Prestart Checklist

It’s crucial to perform periodic safety checks on your equipment. Not only do daily inspections prevent accidents during machine operation, they also maximise efficiency and minimise costs.

To get you started here is our mini excavator prestart checklist.

Things to Do Before Starting Your Mini Excavator

  • Walk around your mini excavator and look for cracks or dents on the exterior of the equipment.
  • Inspect various components of the excavator or mini loaderbody including the mounting holes, the bearing spacer, and the grease fitting. Keep an eye out for cracks or signs of wear and tear.
  • Search for leaks in the Hydraulic cylinder. Then, check the level of the engine oil, coolant, and hydraulic oil.
  • Remove the air and oil filters. Clean or replace them if required.
  • Check the area in front of the radiator. Dirt accumulates in this particular area and causes overheating problems.
  • Grease all hinge pins and bushings to cut down the cost of expensive repairs.
  • Make sure the mini excavator’s safety switches are in proper working order.
  • Next, get inside the cab. Always face the excavator and use the three-point contact to get in and out of the cab.
  • Turn on the equipment and listen for any unusual sounds or vibrations. The machine shouldn’t emit excessive exhaust fumes when it’s in operation.
  • It’s a good idea to look for leaks or emissions below the mini excavator or in the area in front of the operator’s seat.
  • Check the undercarriage components. Inspect the tracks, the drive sprocket, and the front idlers.
  • Check that the tracks have the right tension.
  • Test the indicator lights and the switches on the control panel.
  • Make sure there’s a fully operational fire extinguisher lying in the cab.
  • Clean the windshield and the heating and cooling vents.
  • Inspect the boom, arm, and bucket attachments for cracks or dents.
  • If the bucket teeth look worn out, replace the bucket. If you fail to do so, the mini-excavator will have to work much harder to perform everyday jobs.
  • Extend the arm and boom to determine if the machine is stable during operation. You must also lift the excavator blade and roll the machine forwards and backwards.
  • Perform a 360º rotation of the housing assembly.
  • Refer to the equipment’s safe working limits before beginning any new task.

If you perform these checks daily, you’re less likely to encounter problems when you operate your equipment.

How Can I Prevent Excavator Accidents?

Safety is an important consideration in just about any type of construction or excavation site that is using heavy equipment. While many nations have minimum safety standards and procedures that help to reduce the incidence of excavator accidents, there are also a few basic strategies that workers, site supervisors and others can employ that also help to keep the number of excavator accidents as low as possible. These approaches call for making sure everyone working at the site is well-informed about the function and operation of heavy machinery, setting standards for working around the machinery and generally developing a safety code that not only complies with governmental regulations but actually exceeds those standards to some degree.

One of the most effective means of helping to reduce excavator accidents at a job site is to make sure that everyone working around the heavy equipment understands how the different types of excavators work. This includes having some idea of how the equipment moves, the amount of space required for the equipment to make use of a full range of that movement, and why it is important to remain a minimum distance from the excavator while it is in operation. While many construction site managers do focus on training the personnel who will operate the excavators, educating others who will carry out tasks near the machinery in how to conduct themselves in a safe manner will help to minimize the chance for excavator accidents.

Operators should also receive intensive training on how to operate the excavators, including what to do if the equipment should begin to tip or if an extension should malfunction during use. Preparing operators for handling the unanticipated provides them with a greater ability to successfully initiate certain procedures before abandoning the equipment as well as reducing the chances of some type of sudden movement of the excavator that could result in injury to those nearby. The exact nature of this kind of emergency training will vary based on the type of excavator in use at the site and the range of excavator accidents that could occur as a result of a malfunction.

In many cases, it may be helpful to post placards and secure various areas of the construction site in which excavating equipment will be in use. Temporary fencing along with signs warning workers and visitors to the site to remain a safe distance from the equipment is always a good idea. When these types of deterrents are combined with a comprehensive training program for the equipment operators and a full education for other workers who will be carrying out tasks near the equipment, the potential to prevent excavator accidents is greatly enhanced.