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Tag: tire

Winter Maintenance for Electric Cars

Owning an electric car is different from having a traditional gas-powered vehicle in a lot of ways. You don’t have to wait for the engine to heat up in the morning, and the heater will work as soon as you press the button. Forget about pumping the gas and all that stuff, too. But there are still some winter maintenance tasks you need to complete for your electric car. You won’t have to check the oil, the spark plugs, or the fuel filter. However, there are several winter maintenance tasks you’ll want to complete to keep your electric car running great.

Check the Wiper Blades

Check your wiper blades at least once a year, and replace them if needed. You don’t want to discover your wiper blades are worn out during a rain or snow storm. Examine the blades for signs of wear by looking at them from the side. Your blades should be in a straight, even line. If you see visible gaps or tears in the blades, you need to replace them.

Check the Coolant

Like gasoline-powered cars, electric cars have a coolant system. Check your coolant level, and add coolant to the engine if needed. Coolant is important in winter, just as it is in summer. The engine still needs to avoid overheating, and in winter that engine might be working overtime.

Rotate the Tires

You should actually do this for any type of car, be it electric, hybrid, or a gas-guzzler. Take the time to rotate your tires at the beginning of winter. You’ll have to remove all four tires at once to perform this task, so make sure you do it safely.

Check Fluid Levels

Take a look at all your car’s fluids. There is no oil in an electric car, but you do have brake fluid and windshield wiper fluid in addition to the coolant. Check the level on both of these, and add more if needed.

Driving Electric in Winter

Your electric car will continue to function normally in winter. You won’t notice much difference in how your vehicle drives, but you will notice a difference in battery drain. Your car’s heat draws energy from the battery. In winter when you’re using more battery power to heat the car and drive, you may need to charge your battery more frequently.

Your electric car will have noticeably less range on cold days. On extremely cold days, your range may get as low as 45 miles. To conserve battery power, make sure you use the “Eco Mode” setting if your car has one. Plan your trips carefully, and always charge your battery before you leave home.

You’ll still want to keep an ice scraper in your car to remove ice and frost before you start driving, and it’s a good idea to let the ice melt from the windows before you get out on the road.

Battery-Saving Tips

Battery drain is going to be your biggest concern during winter. Practice some everyday maintenance to conserve as much battery power as possible. When you charge before you leave your home, go ahead and turn the heater on while the car is still plugged in. You can get the interior toasty warm without losing any battery energy. Turn off your cabin heater, and use seat heaters to stay warm while you drive and conserve even more battery energy.

When you park your car, try to find a sheltered spot. A heated garage is ideal, obviously, but when that’s not available look for a covered area, at least. Any type of weather protection will help shield your car from the cold, which helps reduce battery drain.

Good Winter Maintenance

Practice good winter maintenance on your electric car to keep it in great shape and running well. Electric cars are much easier to maintain than gas-powered vehicles, and they offer a lot of advantages in winter when temperatures drop.

Winter Car Care for People Who Park Outside

Parking outside in the winter is the pits, especially if you live in a cold, snowy climate. Caring for your car correctly in a cold climate is critical for car maintenance. Especially if you have a custom car, it’s important to protect the paint.

Clean Off Any Salt

If you like in a snowy or icy climate, you are more than familiar with slick roads and truckloads of ice salt. And while ice salt may keep your freeways safer, it can be really damaging to your car. All cars in winter will encounter ice salt, but if you park your car outside, you run the risk of your car being sprayed with salt as the snow removal crew comes through.

To care for your car, even in the winter, wash it often. You can take it to a car cleaner or go winter-friendly waterless and clean it yourself. You’ll also want to put some sort of protective wax on your vehicle. A polymer wax barrier can be added at almost any local car wash and will protect those hard-to-reach areas of your car.

Protect Your Windshield

If you park outside in the winter, your windshield takes a hit. In order to make sure that your windshield is protected from the elements, start by making sure there are no small cracks or chips. Cracks and chips have a way of rapidly expanding in the winter months and if not taken care of before the freezing temperatures hit, you could be left with one big crack.

You will also want to protect your windshield in other ways during the winter. When you park outside overnight, make sure to cover your windshield with a protective covering. It is also a good idea to leave your wipers raised overnight in case it freezes outside. If your wipers are not raised, you run the risk of having them freeze to the windshield.

Lastly, you can make your own windshield de-icing spray. Take two parts rubbing alcohol and one part water and combine them in a spray bottle. Shake well and then spray liberally on thick chunks of ice on your windshield. You can also create a de-icing solution by combining three scoops of road salt to a spray bottle of water. This solution can also be used to melt the ice off your windshield and speed up your morning routine.

Maintain Your Tires and Fluids

There are also just a few basic things you should do for your car as the winter rolls around in cold cities. If necessary, swap out your regular tires for snow tires. Especially if you only have a two-wheel drive, snow tires can make a big difference. It’s also important to check your tire pressure once every week or so to make sure that the change in temperature outside hasn’t brought a change in pressure inside.

You’ll also want to check your car’s coolant levels to make sure that it has enough anti-freeze to get you through the winter.

Keep a Repair Kit in the Car

Emergencies happen, and if you park your car outside all winter, you can increase your risk of auto-related issues. If for some reason you end up in a pinch, you will want to make sure that you have a car emergency kit on hand. Car emergency kits can be customized to your situation and season.

While it’s always important to have road flairs, first aid kits, and a little food on hand, it’s also important to have warm winter clothing stocked up. Keep a coat and some gloves and socks in the back of your car, a blanket too. Even if it’s just a space blanket, the extra warmth may keep all of your fingers and toes intact while you wait for help to arrive.

Other important things to include in the kit are a knife, a flashlight, jumper cables, a cigarette lighter charger and any necessary medications that you cannot go without. Even though help will certainly be on the way, you want to be prepared for any icy breakdown.

Winter Car Care for People Who Park Outside

Parking outside in the winter is the pits, especially if you live in a cold, snowy climate. Caring for your car correctly in a cold climate is critical for car maintenance. Especially if you have a custom car, it’s important to protect the paint.

Clean Off Any Salt

If you like in a snowy or icy climate, you are more than familiar with slick roads and truckloads of ice salt. And while ice salt may keep your freeways safer, it can be really damaging to your car. All cars in winter will encounter ice salt, but if you park your car outside, you run the risk of your car being sprayed with salt as the snow removal crew comes through.

To care for your car, even in the winter, wash it often. You can take it to a car cleaner or go winter-friendly waterless and clean it yourself. You’ll also want to put some sort of protective wax on your vehicle. A polymer wax barrier can be added at almost any local car wash and will protect those hard-to-reach areas of your car.

Protect Your Windshield

If you park outside in the winter, your windshield takes a hit. In order to make sure that your windshield is protected from the elements, start by making sure there are no small cracks or chips. Cracks and chips have a way of rapidly expanding in the winter months and if not taken care of before the freezing temperatures hit, you could be left with one big crack.

You will also want to protect your windshield in other ways during the winter. When you park outside overnight, make sure to cover your windshield with a protective covering. It is also a good idea to leave your wipers raised overnight in case it freezes outside. If your wipers are not raised, you run the risk of having them freeze to the windshield.

Lastly, you can make your own windshield de-icing spray. Take two parts rubbing alcohol and one part water and combine them in a spray bottle. Shake well and then spray liberally on thick chunks of ice on your windshield. You can also create a de-icing solution by combining three scoops of road salt to a spray bottle of water. This solution can also be used to melt the ice off your windshield and speed up your morning routine.

Maintain Your Tires and Fluids

There are also just a few basic things you should do for your car as the winter rolls around in cold cities. If necessary, swap out your regular tires for snow tires. Especially if you only have a two-wheel drive, snow tires can make a big difference. It’s also important to check your tire pressure once every week or so to make sure that the change in temperature outside hasn’t brought a change in pressure inside.

You’ll also want to check your car’s coolant levels to make sure that it has enough anti-freeze to get you through the winter.

Keep a Repair Kit in the Car

Emergencies happen, and if you park your car outside all winter, you can increase your risk of auto-related issues. If for some reason you end up in a pinch, you will want to make sure that you have a car emergency kit on hand. Car emergency kits can be customized to your situation and season.

While it’s always important to have road flairs, first aid kits, and a little food on hand, it’s also important to have warm winter clothing stocked up. Keep a coat and some gloves and socks in the back of your car, a blanket too. Even if it’s just a space blanket, the extra warmth may keep all of your fingers and toes intact while you wait for help to arrive.

Other important things to include in the kit are a knife, a flashlight, jumper cables, a cigarette lighter charger and any necessary medications that you cannot go without. Even though help will certainly be on the way, you want to be prepared for any icy breakdown.

Winter Car Care for People Who Park Outside

Parking outside in the winter is the pits, especially if you live in a cold, snowy climate. Caring for your car correctly in a cold climate is critical for car maintenance. Especially if you have a custom car, it’s important to protect the paint.

Clean Off Any Salt

If you like in a snowy or icy climate, you are more than familiar with slick roads and truckloads of ice salt. And while ice salt may keep your freeways safer, it can be really damaging to your car. All cars in winter will encounter ice salt, but if you park your car outside, you run the risk of your car being sprayed with salt as the snow removal crew comes through.

To care for your car, even in the winter, wash it often. You can take it to a car cleaner or go winter-friendly waterless and clean it yourself. You’ll also want to put some sort of protective wax on your vehicle. A polymer wax barrier can be added at almost any local car wash and will protect those hard-to-reach areas of your car.

Protect Your Windshield

If you park outside in the winter, your windshield takes a hit. In order to make sure that your windshield is protected from the elements, start by making sure there are no small cracks or chips. Cracks and chips have a way of rapidly expanding in the winter months and if not taken care of before the freezing temperatures hit, you could be left with one big crack.

You will also want to protect your windshield in other ways during the winter. When you park outside overnight, make sure to cover your windshield with a protective covering. It is also a good idea to leave your wipers raised overnight in case it freezes outside. If your wipers are not raised, you run the risk of having them freeze to the windshield.

Lastly, you can make your own windshield de-icing spray. Take two parts rubbing alcohol and one part water and combine them in a spray bottle. Shake well and then spray liberally on thick chunks of ice on your windshield. You can also create a de-icing solution by combining three scoops of road salt to a spray bottle of water. This solution can also be used to melt the ice off your windshield and speed up your morning routine.

Maintain Your Tires and Fluids

There are also just a few basic things you should do for your car as the winter rolls around in cold cities. If necessary, swap out your regular tires for snow tires. Especially if you only have a two-wheel drive, snow tires can make a big difference. It’s also important to check your tire pressure once every week or so to make sure that the change in temperature outside hasn’t brought a change in pressure inside.

You’ll also want to check your car’s coolant levels to make sure that it has enough anti-freeze to get you through the winter.

Keep a Repair Kit in the Car

Emergencies happen, and if you park your car outside all winter, you can increase your risk of auto-related issues. If for some reason you end up in a pinch, you will want to make sure that you have a car emergency kit on hand. Car emergency kits can be customized to your situation and season.

While it’s always important to have road flairs, first aid kits, and a little food on hand, it’s also important to have warm winter clothing stocked up. Keep a coat and some gloves and socks in the back of your car, a blanket too. Even if it’s just a space blanket, the extra warmth may keep all of your fingers and toes intact while you wait for help to arrive.

Other important things to include in the kit are a knife, a flashlight, jumper cables, a cigarette lighter charger and any necessary medications that you cannot go without. Even though help will certainly be on the way, you want to be prepared for any icy breakdown.